Good Fat


High Density Fat


High Cholesterol "Good fats" HDL (Good)

About one fourth to one third of blood cholesterol is carried by high-density lipoprotein (HDL). HDL cholesterol is known as "good" cholesterol, because high levels of HDL seem to protect against heart attack. Low levels of HDL (less than 40 mg/dL) also increase the risk of heart disease. Medical experts think that HDL tends to carry cholesterol away from the arteries and back to the liver, where it's passed from the body. Some experts believe that HDL removes excess cholesterol from arterial plaque, slowing its build up.

Triglyceride is a form of fat made in the body. Elevated triglycerides can be due to overweight/obesity, physical inactivity, cigarette smoking, excess alcohol consumption and a diet very high in carbohydrates (60 percent of total calories or more). People with high triglycerides often have a high total cholesterol level, including a high LDL (bad) level and a low HDL (good) level. Many people with heart disease and/or diabetes also have high triglyceride levels.

Where we get these fats

Omega 6 (O-6) fatty acids are mostly in "land based foods”, such as animal products, for example, beef, pork, poultry, eggs, dairy (other than non fat- skim milk etc.), beans soy), grains (e.g corn, wheat, etc), nuts (walnuts have some O-3). Omega 3 are mostly in sea foods (especially fatty fish, although they have O-6 too. Wild fish get O-3 from krill. Land O-3 from foods such as (walnuts, purslaine, flax seed.

The fatty acid most commonly found in flax-seed oil is α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18 carbons and 3 double bonds). In fish oil, they are eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20 carbons and 5 double bonds), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22 carbons and 6 double bonds). ALA converts to EPA and DHA, but in limited amounts. Best to get your EPA and DHA from actual wild salmon and your ALA from flax.

Some foods that contain omega 3 fatty acids

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential to life, because they're necessary for our health, but our bodies can't make them. We get them in our diets in foods such as salmon, tuna, and halibut. Other seafood including algae, krill some plants; and nut oils. They're crucial in brain development, and are anti-inflammatory. Helpful in the prevention of heart disease, depression, and bipolar disorder.

Where are the most common places to find omega 6 fats?

Omega 6 diet sources Omega 6 (O-6) fatty acids are mostly found within and foods, examples of these are animal products, beef, pork, poultry, eggs, dairy (other than non fat- skim milk etc.), beans (e.g. soy), grains (e.g corn, wheat, etc), nuts (walnuts have some O-3). Omega 3 are mostly in sea foods (especially fatty fish, although they have O-6 too. Wild fish get O-3 from krill. Land O-3 (walnuts, purslaine, flax not as well used)

Try to get most of your fat intake from whole food, unheated, unsaturated sources.

These fats are the ones that consistently show up as cardio protective because they either lower cholesterol or they come with other benefits such as antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.

Just remember that they are best for you in their natural, unheated, unsalted state, particularly hemp seeds, the only commonly used seed that contains GLA, a crucial, hormone regulating fat that is rare in other foods.

OILS (extra virgin olive oil is perfect for salads and is most beneficial used at low temperatures,

grape seed is great for higher temperature cooking) Grape seed oil’s temperature can be raised quite high before it begins to smoke so it is less damaged by the heat. It also may help prevent the oxidation of cholesterol.

This oxidation is what does the damage to the cardiovascular system, and there is some evidence that the antioxidants in grape seeds help protect blood vessel damage that occurs with high blood pressure.

To maintain the beneficial properties of your oil and ensure it is as healthy as possible.

How to maintain cook healthily

Heat your pan first to medium or high heat without any oil in it. Have your ingredients ready to go in before you add the oil and add the food as quickly as you can after you add the oil.

This will prevent sticking, preserving the oil, and give a better colour and texture to your food. Extra virgin olive oil is an excellent source of unsaturated fat. However, you only get the benefit if it is cold pressed and served raw and unheated.

Add healthy fats to your diet

AVOCADOS: Avocados are loaded with good (monounsaturated) fat. Some people are put off the idea of eating avocados due to the fact that they are high in calories, however consuming Avocado will ensure you benefit from a beautiful natural source of fat, that is high in nutrients and has a impressive amino acid profile. Avocados are normally eaten raw so to ensure you obtain the good fat at its optimum as heating denatures the fruit. Avocado cooking oil has a high smoking point so is also very health to cook with.

They also contain potassium to regulate blood pressure and the nutrient foliate for heart health, add avocado to your salad to makes the fat soluble vitamins more available to your body.


Something Fishy?

Scientists have discovered a link between Omega 3 Fatty Acids and leptin that look promising for consumers of fish.

Fish contains Omega 3 fatty acids researchers found that a group of people who ate a high proportion of fish every day had lower leptin levels, despite eating the same calorie

load and having the same body fat as the fish free control group, suggesting that a fish rich diet increased their bodies sensitivity to leptin.

There’s good news, too, for those that are already overweight and leptin resistant it’s only temporary.

So even if you’re overweight and likely leptin resistant, you can improve on that state. Unlike type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance, which is very hard to reverse, leptin resistance is fairly correctable with a normal, healthy diet and exercise.

Something really simple that everyone can do to keep their leptin levels high and keep cravings under control is to sleep well.

When you go to sleep, your leptin levels naturally rise, but if you cut your sleeping short, your body tries to adjust by making you hungry again. Research has found that shorter sleep periods (6 hours or less instead of lower overall daily leptin levels, cause an increase in appetite, and even make people crave carbs and other fattening foods. It is important for your body to rest so it can maintain its natural hormonal balance, allowing you to look and feel your best.

Unsaturated Fat

Here are some good choices of unsaturated fats:

Salmon

Mackerel

Herring

Tuna

Canola oil

Soybeans

Soybean oil

Corn oil

Flax seeds

Flax seed oil

Peanuts

Peanut butter (without added hydrogenated oils or sugar)

Tub margarine/spreads (with 0g trans fats)

Olives

Olive oil

Sunflower oil

Safflower oil

Avocados

Almonds

Walnuts

Hazelnuts

Sesame Seeds

Pumpkin Seeds

Unsaturated fats are divided into monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats, and both types are thought to have beneficial effects on cholesterol levels.

Monounsaturated fats help lower LDL (bad) cholesterol while also boosting HDL (good) cholesterol.


Polyunsaturated fats are also thought to help lower total and bad cholesterol.

But monounsaturated fats tend to be favoured over polyunsaturated fats because some research suggests that polyunsaturated fats are less stable, and can reduce levels of good cholesterol as well as bad.

But let's not ignore polyunsaturated fats.

These are often a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, found mostly in cold-water fish, nuts, oils and seeds, and also in dark leafy greens, flaxseed oils and some vegetable oils.

One kind of omega-3 fatty acid is an "essential fatty acid," which cannot be manufactured by our bodies, so eating these foods is the only way to get them. Omega-3 fatty acids are thought to lower blood pressure, combat LDL (bad) cholesterol, fight inflammation and protect the brain and nervous system.

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Author: Gareth Myles

#Goodfat #healthyfat #highdensityfat #hdl #highdensitylipoprotein #oliveoil #grapeseed #howtocookhealthy #avocados

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